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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 94 (some duplicates have been removed)
on the local economy. positive effects in terms of lower training costs and turnover and less lost time at work and dedicated employees, so small businesses, mid size and large businesses benefit from in, as well as local government because they don't have as many people relying on social services. so, the data doesn't back that up. in fact, it's a positive thing he when we do it in a planful fashion to raise the minimum wage. >> on this issue, just like an economist. on the one hand, on the other hand, there are studies on both sides. but jonas there is an argument that higher minimum wages reducing turnover, which lessens the costs of employers and could incase employments. >> you would never leave the job if you could get it, it's a pretty good wage. negatives and benefits. both sides of kind of right. if the minimum wage is low $2, it wouldn't disrupt the job market. if it's $50, high unemployment, but a-- there's obviously a level between there where the negatives would exceed the positives. there are positives, workers would get more money under the plan and not outsourced to china. you n
. and fidelity investments. >> your personal economy is made up of the things that matter most, including your career. as those things change, fidelity can help you adjust your retirement plan, rethink how you are invested, and refocus as your career moves forward. wherever you are, a fidelity ira has a wide array of choices that can fit your personal economy. fidelity investments, turn here. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business. butoffering specialized solutions in the capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." >> hello, your watching "gmt," on bbc world news." the south african athlete is formally charged with murdering his girlfriend. his lawyers have applied for bail. the prosecution accused him of premeditated murder. the defense says the shooting was accidental. his girlfriend's funeral took place today. a secret community behind the series of hacking attacks on u.s. infrastructure according to an america
economy to the brink of destruction. this time over a march 1st deadline for the across-the-board government cuts known as the sequester. >> ts is not a game. this is reality. >> i don't like the sequester. it's taking a meat axe to our government. >> these steps would seriously damage the fragile american economy. >> still fragile enough that four years after the recession the u.s. economy actually shrank in the last three months of 2012. the storm clouds were ready to blow away and washington basically called them back. >> i think we're all aware that we have some urgent business to do. >> if not for indecisive, uncompromising, and polarizing politicians, america's economy could take off again. >> we are producing more energy and america can become an energy exporter. >> we're in the midst of an energy boom and it's lowering the price of electricity and bringing manufacturing back to america. a housing boom fueled by the lowest interest rates in history. and 35 months of private sector job creation. america's future could be great. >> i'd like to focus on what lies bey
? the fear is there. of course we need cuts, you need it in stages. you don't do it when the economy is fragile. you do it when the recovery is stronger. and these across the board cuts, bad news. >> and tobin, i wouldn't call them cuts, they're trims, and to hear the white house, i'm afraid to go out of the house, should we be scared of this? >> obviously, the economy is scared of something else and scared of it turning to 26 trillion dollars in a 15 trillion dollars economy, in other words, we would in fact be great. the 85 billion, of course, doesn't account for the 50 or 60 billion, and if you add that back in. this is literally what the government spends, remember, the government spends 4 billion a day and this is actually, to carry this, this is about, you know, maybe ten days of total spending all in. no, it's not a big deal, it's total semantics. >> we've got selling on this show, gary b. shouldn't we be hitting the panic button? >> absolutely not. we should be hitting the panic button if we d because there's a few head scratchers here, i know that jehmu is worried about this
a renaissance may be at hand for the u.s. economy? find out right now on "your money." >>> despite a recession in europe, major mergers in the united states show evidence that business is picking up. america could be on the road to prosperity if not for our politicians standing on the way. i'm ali velshi. this is "your money." there's ap economic storm hovering just off our shores. the headwinds are gathering strength as our elected official once again seem prepared to take the american economy to the brink of destruction. this time over a march 1st deadline for the across-the-board government cuts known as the sequester. >> this is not a game. this is reality. >> i don't like the sequester. it's taking a meat axe to our government. >> these steps would seriously damage the fragile american economy. >> still fragile enough that four years after the recession the u.s. economy actually shrank in the last three months of 2012. the storm clouds were ready to blow away and washington basically called them back. >> i think we're all aware that we have some urgent business to do. >> if not for indeci
in the local economy by my parts. every person who works on my product is going to raise the price of my product. every hand that touches the unit that i sell, a certain percentage of the company buys this products. every time i go to a vendor to get a part, my costs will increase. my competitor build a similar part for almost a third of what i build a mine. you will take away the factory workers who manufacture my parts. this is all usa jobs. lower the price of gas. back to two bucks a gallon and you won't have to worry about the minimum wage. host: how would an economist pre-minimum wage respond to that caller? guest: you are raising the cost of that worker to that business. that worker will have more money to spend. you can make more profits. you can pass the cost to people who are buying your goods by raising prices. raising the minimum wage has an effect on the economy. the question -- if there is a chance it would raise unemployment or perhaps put a business in the red. host: michelle, tacoma, washington. caller: i just realized our state is one of the higher states with minimum w
these markets and the economy is headed, well, we will be talking with and welcome to our own rick adonis, senior u.s. economist for deutsche bank security. good to have you here. your year. i mean, we have people walking around with long faces. all parts of the country because they're unemployed. the economy is contracting. and they just don't understand how nice it is to be on wall street. >> well, it is chilly down on wall street. i assure you. but we are seeing some positive signs in the economy. so, yes of the fourth quarter did not look so great. the best top-level gdp number. but when you look beneath the surface we see some important undercurrents. does green shoots cut consumer spending. lou: seeing that come back. >> consumer spending is picking up. the investment which had been contracting. nav is picking up again. the housing market is picking up. but the domestic economy looks decent. it needs time to run until that an employer rate is down, but it increasingly looks like we are building some momentum. lou: you know, i really am. and i am delighted to see your optimism and to
trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. >> at 20 minutes past the hour, i have your fox news minute. a south african judge has allowed oscar pistorious to go free on $113,000 bail. the track star is charged with the murder of his girlfriend on valentine's day. oscar pistorious says he shot the model accident late thinking she was a intruder in his house. prosecutors say it was premeditated murder. a fire department official says only the flight team was on board the chopper when it went down. it was heading to pick up a patient 70 miles away. cuban president has raised the possibility of retiring, but did not say when he may make that decision. the 82-year-old leader made the comment in savanna. those are your headlines on the fox business network. back to ashley. ashley: all right. thank you very much. shibani: representatives from boeing meeting with the faa today. solutions for the battery fires that have grounded the 7873 minor. peter barnes is in washington. peter: top boeing executives are expected to propose a new design for
that they can't get to their spending nirvana without getting this economy growing. and the economy is hobbling along, even if slow runners can across the finish line. neil: we may be back to levels of the market where we were five years ago. but it has been a steady climb back to worst -- excuse me, from the worse. net net, is a good barack obama? >> yes, i am for it. we are all investors. we all want to see this thing improve. i agree with bob that economics is about choices. neil: i do buy your argument about the slowly inching back economy here. not in the gangbuster fashion, but enough to compel money that has been nervous. and sitting on the sidelines come back in. but the way it is being committed is not to expand plans and operations as much as it is to retrench buying out a competitor. you're really not expanding your business but you're really just retention the existing business. you are not heralding the success of what is going on. you could argue it is part of the bunker mentality. explain the mechanics of what is happening. >> i think you're absolutely right. the way i put it is
. stuart: tell me the truth. do you think that president obama really values growth for our economy or redistribution of the wealth? >> i think he's far more in the camp of redistribution than growth. and his central campaign theme he made clear was redistributing wealth and he's done it, kept his promise. >> let me read this for you. the congressman henry waxman demands more executive orders from the president. in a letter to the white house, waxman wants the president to issue new regulations on everything from power plants to oil refineries and even household appliances. henry waxman, a member of congress, he wants the president to go around congress with his voice. >> we have the separation of powers in this country. something that's hugely important. with a waxman is recommending and i recognize just waxman represents to me a liberal, too. and i'm against conservative or moderate as liberal. but the idea of president going around congress to get things done, especially when he gets up in his state of the union and says that the sequester is not his work, but the work of congres
the united states and greece. first, we're a huge diversified economy, not a little country dependant on tourism. secondly, people in the u.s. pay their taxes, you know. greece had a deficit of about 7% of gdp. that would be over $1 trillion a year in the united states before the collapse. we have a very different story. the third is a huge difference. we have our own currency. greece is like arkansas. the reason why its interest rates went through the roof. everyone thought that. >> i think the point he was trying to make in that that if we don't do something about this the market will figure out that we have a credit problem in the country. >> the markets are smarter than that. >> when you normalize interest rates, right now they are really manipulated, if you normalize interest rates, you're talking about $500 billion going out the door every year just on interest expen expense. that's just paying the interest on the debt. you think that's sustainable? >> that's a lower interest expense than what we had relative to our economy in the early '90s. we could live with that. we lived wi
entire economy to do so. joining me now is robert borosage, a contributing editor of the nation and codirector of the campaign for america's future. what a pleasure to have you on the show. welcome to "viewpoint." >> delighted to be with you. >> john: let's start with this, congress as we know is currently on vacation, again. have both sides sir resigned themselves or some last-minute deal to kick the can further down the road? >> i think you're going to see a lot of last-minute maneuvering and press release and press conferences but it looks pretty much like this sequester is going to take place. >> john: if the pew poll we just mentioned 76% say the president's combination of spending cuts and tax increases is the right approach versus 19% that want only spending cuts. so is it safe to say that no longer -- it doesn't really matter what the people really want? is it just about who can spin, sell their message better come election time next year? >> well, yes and it is perverse. republicans in some ways have a stake in a bad economy in 2014, they'll do better. voters tend to bl
at the pump for the last month. joining us in the next hour, oil man boone pickens. so the economy is at the top of the hour. andrew will get you up to speed on the day's other headlines. >> hedge fund manager david einhorn is taking his apple campaign directly to shareholders. he's going to be hosting a conference call today to argue the merits of distributing hedging preferred stock which, of course, is what this big debate is about. einhorn is battling and seeking an injunction next week to abolish a system for issuing preferred stock. i got a letter overnight from the nation's foundation which has a stake in apple and they are pushing back against david einhorn, something we should probably talk about a little later. >> we will. >> also in the news this morning, boeing is expected to meet with the faa tomorrow and launch a formal plan to get its grounded 787 back into service. the company will be proposing a resign of the dreamliner's batteries. officials say the jets could be back in the air within two months. >>> finally, appear highser bush, inbev want a court to grant a sho
that then goes out and stimulate the world economy like apollo and early space programs stimulated the economy of the world. i got an iphone on my hip that has 2000 times the memory of an apollo computer. can you imagine? the space station guys, they have texts, skype or something up there. and they're all on their laptops. it boggles your mind what is going on there technologically. >> today you could probably tweet what is going on on your flight. on your first and only flight, on the way back to earth, you got to do spacewalk. >> it was totally different. a different experience. as i described being on the moon, it contrasts the gray lunar surface with the blackness of space. people ask me what does the earth like from the moon? i said i cannot tell you because i landed in the center of the moon which took the earth directly overhead. in an apollo space suit, it is like being in a fishbowl. you move your head but the helmut does not move. so i did not get to see the earth very much from the moon. but in lunar orbit, you come around from the backside and there is the earth rise. we landed at
entire economy at risk just to protect a few special interest tax loopholes that benefit the wealthiest individuals and corporations. that's the choice. are you willing to see a bunch of first responders lose their jobs because you want to protect a special interest tax loophole? are you willing to have teachers laid off or kids not have access to head start? or deeper cuts in student loan programs? just because you want to protect a special tax interest loophole that the vast majority of americans don't benefit from. that's the choice. that's the question. and this is not an abstraction. there are people who's livelihoods are at stake, there are communities that are going to be impacted in a negative way. and i know that sometimes all this squabbling in washington seems very abstract. and in the abstract, people like the idea, you know, there must be some spending we can cut. there must be some waste out there absolutely is. but this isn't the right way to do it. so my door is open. i put tough cuts and reforms on the table. i am willing to work with anybody to get this job done. none
and the kind of investments we expect for the economy to grow from the middle out. so our hope is that this does not happen, that we choose-- rather than make this an ideological fight as it appears to be right now among some on the republican caucus, we just do a balanced approach to fix this problem. >> schieffer: i agree with all that b but when you have the speaker of the house saying i can't work with the president any more. every time i work with him i get bermuda. when he says he won't take on the liberals in his own party on reforming the social programs, and then you see the president he's not talking to anybody. he's out making speeches around the country. >> oh, i think that the president is-- he laid out in very complete detail-- >> schieffer: but what is he doing? what are the two sides doing to keep this from happening? >> you saw what he did on tuesday night during the state of the union when he laid out in detail on what he is prepared to do as it relates to fixing this problem. over the last several months we got agreement on $2.5 trillion in deficit reduction
world when you decide chopping down the government and hurting the economy is the smart move. but bring it all down is now the hard right battle cry. slash spending, short the pentagon. crew up traffic control whatever raises the noise level, bashes the democrats and lowers hope. is this the tea party dream? is this john boehner's version of feeding time at the zoo, giving the crazies what they want so they will sit in their seats and behave? is this final payment to insanity the last vestige of what calm republicanism is ready to cough up? but how else can you explain the readiness of the gop leadership to let this fraken stein's monster, it doomsday machine, this sequestration go all out berserk? how else can we understand the party of lincoln doing such economic damage to the republic, such damage and moral to the people. democrat ed rendell and republican michael steele. gentlemen, i want to start with you, michael, because i know you will disagree with me and that's what this is about. i read a lot of good reporting today, not analysis, but good reporting from your side of the aisl
shrinks the deficit dpaster than a growing economy that creates good, middle class jobs. that should be our driving focus, making america a magnet for good jobs, ewinning how people with the skills required to fill those jobs. making sure their hard work leads to a decent living. those are the things we should be pushing ourselves to think about and work on every single day. that's what american people expect. that's what i'm going to work on every single day to help deliver. so i need everybody who's watches today to understand, we've got a few days, congress can do the right thing, we can avert just one more washington manufactured problem that slows our recovery and bring down our deficits in a balanced with, responsible way. that's my goal, that's what would do right by these first respond irs, that's what would do right by america's middle class. that's what i'm going to be working on and fighting for not just over the next few weeks, but over the next few years. thanks very much, everybody. thank you guys for your service. >> the president speak once again, restates his positio
change that perception. let's focus on a reality. by reality i mean economy of our political system. this election has its own economy. the economy as two components. one is an economy of stop, and the other is the economy of extortion. the economy of stop drives us to understand to point to the instability in our government. any system where the tiniest slice of the public dominates in the funding produces a system where a tiny number of americans can effectively block any change. it will always be that or at least almost always be that in the context where some much dependence exists on such a tiny number of participants. it is just a couple thousands who have to band together with these contributions to effectively make it possible that in our structure of separated powers you can block any change. this is an economy that depends on polarization. people point to polarization as the cause. it is an effect. it depends on the dysfunction, because the more dysfunctional the institution is, the easier it is to sell this opportunity to block. this function is the business model, which
laid out for republicans. it's not just the economy that will suffer from the looming cuts next week. that's march 1st. national security will as well and it's seriously at risk. >> already the threat of these cuts has forced the navy to delay an aircraft carrier that was supposed to deploy to the persian gulf, and as our military leaders have made clear, changes like this, not well thought through, not phased in properly, changes like this affect our ability to respond to threats in unstable parts of the world. >> governor rendell, i just wonder what you think would be the situation, the scenario, if it comes to this. we pick up our paper some day and the newspaper said, carrier group can't make it to persian gulf for lack of funding. i mean, i just wonder if we're ready to face something -- i don't think we ever faced that in world war ii, in korea, in vietnam. we're unable to fight the wars we're in. >> chris, overall it's an incredibly bad situation for the country, and we can argue over who deserves the blame for this, and there's probably blame to go around, but right now the r
that says great. let's have sequestration. let's cut $85 billion out of the economy. let's remove hope from the country. i doubt that you read that it said take hope out of the country and ruin the economy. but i get your point. what i find interesting in your argument, chris, is that you seem to overlook the fact that you have just as many democrats out there screaming the same thing on the left. starti ining howard deem. also, the whole idea of sequestration emanated -- >> what office does howard dean own? >> i'm just saying. you're pointing and say ing say >> it pushes both of these folks -- >> i'm sosh ri. i just want to check your facts. what democrats holding office in the congress want to see sequestration. >> the ones who voted for it. starting with them. you mean this whole thing got passed just on republican votes? >> it was called kicking the can -- >> are you kidding? >> i'm going to ask you again, do you believe right now there are any democrats in the house or senate who want to see sequestration? >> yes. >> name one. >> there have been folks on the record, chris. i can't name
the u.s. economy will grow slowly this year as tax increases and spending cuts offset improvements in the private sector. bruce willis is "a good day to die hard" pulled in $25 million. "identity thief" rant and with a close second, 23.4 million. that is the latest from the fox business network. giving you the power to prosper. ♪ customers didn't like it. so why do banks do it? hello? hello?! if your bank doesn't let you talk to a real person 24/7, you need an ally. hello? ally bank. your money needs an ally. ♪ dagen: $101.7 billion over the next ten years. the joint committee think this is the cost of a massive new sales tax to pay for obamacare. elizabeth macdonald is here with the bottom line. explain how this is, ultimately, being passed on. >> it is an excise tax or sales tax. look at this number. $7200. health insurers will pass this on. look at this. joint committee and taxation think that health insurers will pass this on. expect it to hit the insurance, basically, consumer in the form of higher premiums. they estimate 2.5% greater cost. we have two congressmen looking
. >> will it get done before the economy starts to feel the impact before thousands of people lose their jobs? >> it absolutely should. that would be the responsible thing to do. >> congressman joaquin castro, come back again, it's good to see you. >> i will. >> i want to play a part of what president obama said yesterday about the sequester. take say listen. >> border patrol agents will see their hours reduced. fbi agents will be furloughed. federal prosecutors will have to close cases and let criminals go. air traffic controllers and airport security will see cutbacks. >> the new york times did reporting and found that those things obviously may happen eventually, but march 1st is not going to be some date when all of a sudden everything happens. and they actually think many members of congress have more time to play with. how is that perception playing in to the sense of urgency on capitol hill? >> if the president isn't able to rally the public and build public opinion that this is a bad thing, it's going to be -- i think the public has been told the sky is falling a lot by this congress.
hard and part of the economy. for those of us who fly you are going to have to adjust the schedule and reduce the number of flights. we will see the system remain safe, but boy i will tell you the lines when you travel are going to increase unless congress and the administration step up and they have this week to do it. so they could step into it and avert the sequester. >> thank you for joining us tonight. >>> let's play "hardball" ♪ >> it's a down and dirty world when youp decide shop cho ping the government is screw up traffic control, whatever raises the noise lefrl. bashes the democrats and lowers hope. is this what satisfies the boys in the back row? is this john boehner's version of feedings the zoo? is this final payment to insanity? the last ves taj of what calm republicanism is ready to cough up. how else can you let this frankenstein monster, this doomsday machine, this sequestration go ber circumto damage and mor real to the people. >>> gentlemen, i wrant to start with you, michael, because i know you'll disagree with me. i read a lot of reporting today that says grea
to our national security as well as to our farm economy. whether we are talking food or water or energy security, let me put it this way -- in the future, more crops in the field can mean fewer soldiers in the field. at the same time, as important as our defense capabilities are, we also need to rebalance toward the other three d's. the u.s. today spends more on defense than on diplomacy, democracy, and development all put together. meanwhile, in the past year china has more than doubled its investment in developing new agricultural technologies. those are the kinds of farsighted policies that are enabling china to emerge as a world power and which we, frankly, need to get back to. as we shift our focus and our resources toward smarter, more constructive forms of international interaction, it is critical that food security remain at the center of shaping this secure world. when it comes to diplomacy, that means working stronger public- private and government-to government relationships, like u.s. ais promising initiatives, initiatives like feed the future being country that a lead and f
're going to cut everything right now, sequestration. it's going to slow down the economy. you've got democrats -- you've got the president running around because he only knows how to do one thing, ask for higher taxes. he's leading with the taxes. we've got to raise more taxes. it's the rich, it's the corporations, tax, tax, tax. i thought we had this debate before. democrats don't seem to understand that taxing americans dampens the economy, hurts small businesses, hurts a lot of americans. republicans don't seem to understand that massive unfocused cuts right now are going to slow down the economy and hurt americans, too. >> you seriously have to wonder whether anyone in washington, in the house, in the senate, in the white house, in the administration, republican, democrat, do they ever go outdoors? do they ever see what happens every day to ordinary americans? people who have been getting crushed economically for the past 10 or 15 years are now getting crushed again, doubly so. the payroll tax has been eliminated. have you checked out the price of gasoline over the past couple of
is hurting our economy and what we need to spark more growth. sandra: crocs ceo joining us first on stock business, a pop today, following earnings, find out what the foot ware company is doing to follow up a record setting 20 # 12. david, the shoes still sell like hot cakes. daifd -- david: they came back because of good management. we'll talk about that, but, first, what drove the markets today with the data download. a sea of red on wall street with all three ending lower the second day in a row. s&p in negative territory for the week, on track to snap the longest winning streak in more than two years. materials, financials, and technology the worst performing sectors today while telecom and consumer staples posted gains. americans applying for jobless benefits rose more than expectedded last week. initial claims jumped 20,000 to 362,000, and revised higher, and this happens often by 1,000 to 342,000. existing home sales edged higher in january as inventory dropped to the lowest level in more than 13 years. the national association of released -- of realtors had it 4.92 million, sandy?
're not necessary. they'll hurt our economy. they'll raise the unemployment rate. and the reason is because congress has not been able to compromise on a deficit reduction package that's more sensible. >> yesterday the president insisted sudden across-the-board spending cuts would be unnecessary and damaging and he made sure that first responders were there to punctuate the message. let's watch and listen. >> border patrol agents will see their hours reduced. fbi agents will be furloughed. federal prosecutors will have to close cases and let criminals go. air traffic controllers and airport security will see cutbacks, which means more delays at airports across the country. thousands of teachers and educators will be laid off. >> and keeping up the drum beat, house minority leader nancy pelosi will hold hearings on how middle class families could be hurt by the spending cuts that could kick in march 1st. joining me is u.s. congressman adam shiff of california. i was so impressed by the way you explained all of this this morning on msnbc. i'd like you to do it again. your take on what this fight is ab
's worried something good could be happening in the economy. something like they see like loan growth or job growth, we don't want that, right? job growth, that's terrifying. it means the fed won't keep interest rates down anymore. what we want, obviously, is permanent bad news. be careful, we had a similar selloff when the last notes came out, that was followed by a rally of epic proportions. as good a reason as any to take profits. then we have the sequester sneaking up on us again, that bid to cut federal spending with a meat axe. hmm, i thought we wanted government spending cutback? isn't that what people are clambering for? everyone says it's bad and it's going to hit the military really hard, right? lead story in "usa today" says so. let me ask you a question, how the heck did the philly defense index hit an all-time high in this session if the defense department's really going to get whacked. the sequester bark may be a tad less than its bite. what kind of word is sequester anyway? i don't want to fear words that seem like they're kind of made up for the occasion like fiscal cliff. bu
to do with a rotten economy. older adults are staying in the work force longer any younger adults staying out of the work force longer because they cannot get into it. host: if you don't have a retirement, there is this option -- norman is joining us from maryland, 45 years old. how much have you saved so far for your retirement? caller: first, thanks for having an article on this subject. i have been waiting for this opportunity. i have $2,800 in my 401k plan. i am wanting your opinion for people my age. i was born in 1968. it seems we are at the tail end of the pension plans and profit- sharing and at the front end of all the financial crises in the country. people my age, it seems we were never able told the 10% we were told, the city to hold 10% your entire working life for your retirement. between jobs and layoffs -- and i have always been fortunate to make as much as college graduates, but between the jobs and layoffs throughout my work life and the clinton era taxes and everything -- i'm not blaming him, i thought he was a good president even though i am a republican, i jus
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 94 (some duplicates have been removed)